The creature from jekyll island book pdf

For other people with the same name, see Edward Griffin. American far-right conspiracy theorist, author, lecturer, and filmmaker. Griffin’s writings include a number of views regarding various political, defense and health care the creature from jekyll island book pdf. In his book World Without Cancer, he argues that cancer is a nutritional deficiency that can be cured by consuming amygdalin, a view regarded as quackery by the medical community.


11 Truth movement, and supports a specific John F. Also, he believes the actual geographical location of the biblical Noah’s Ark is located at the Durupınar site in Turkey. Griffin was born in Detroit, Michigan, on November 7, 1931, and became a child voice actor on local radio from 1942 to 1947. He earned his bachelor’s degree from the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor in 1953, majoring in speech and communications.

In 1954, he served in the United States Army, and in 1956 was discharged as a sergeant. Shortly thereafter, he began writing and producing documentary-style videos about the same controversial topics covered in his books, such as cancer, the historical authenticity of Noah’s Ark, the Federal Reserve System, the Supreme Court of the United States, terrorism, subversion, and foreign policy. In 1964, Griffin wrote his first book, The Fearful Master, on the United Nations, a topic that recurs throughout his writings.

International banking, United States foreign policy, the U. American news and entertainment media as propaganda, the Supreme Court of the United States, and the United Nations. 1969 video lecture, More Deadly Than War: The Communist Revolution in America, was printed in English and Dutch. In 1974, he published World Without Cancer, and in 1975, he wrote a sympathetic biography of JBS founder Robert W.

In May 2009, Griffin helped Robert L. Schulz and Edwin Vieira organize a meeting at Jekyll Island of thirty people including “radical tax protesters, militiamen, nativist extremists, anti-Obama ‘birthers,’ hard-line libertarians, conspiracy-minded individuals with theories about secret government concentration camps, even a raging anti-Semite named Edgar Steele”. Speakers at the meeting “warned of ‘increasing national instability,’ worried about a coming ‘New World Order,’ denounced secret schemes to merge Canada, Mexico and the United States, and furiously attacked the new president’s ‘socialized’ policies and failure to end illegal immigration,” and attendees made plans for a “continental congress” that occurred in November 2009 that was hosted by the We the People Foundation.