Commentary on the book of philippians pdf

The Book of Habakkuk is the eighth book of the 12 minor prophets of the Hebrew Bible. It is attributed to the prophet Habakkuk, and was probably composed in the late 7th century BC. Of the commentary on the book of philippians pdf chapters in the book, the first two are a dialog between Yahweh and the prophet. It is used in the Epistle to the Romans 1:17, Epistle to the Galatians 3:11, and the Epistle to the Hebrews 10:38 as the starting point of the concept of faith.

A copy of these chapters is included in the Habakkuk Commentary, found among the Dead Sea Scrolls. Chapter 3 may be an independent addition, now recognized as a liturgical piece, but was possibly written by the same author as chapters 1 and 2. The prophet Habakkuk is generally believed to have written his book in the mid-to-late 7th century BC, not long before the Babylonians’ siege and capture of Jerusalem in 586 BC.

Habakkuk identifies himself as a prophet in the opening verse. Due to the liturgical nature of the book of Habakkuk, there have been some scholars who think that the author may have been a temple prophet.

Temple prophets are described in 1 Chronicles 25:1 as using lyres, harps and cymbals. Some feel that this is echoed in Habakkuk 3:19b, and that Habakkuk may have been a Levite and singer in the Temple. The only canonical information that exists comes from the book that is named for him. Akkadian word hambakuku for a kind of plant.

Although his name does not appear in any other part of the Jewish Bible, Rabbinic tradition holds Habakkuk to be the Shunammite woman’s son, who was restored to life by Elisha in 2 Kings 4:16. The prophet Habakkuk is also mentioned in the narrative of Bel and the Dragon, part of the deuterocanonical additions to Daniel in a late section of that book. In the superscription of the Old Greek version, Habakkuk is called the son of Joshua of the tribe of Levi.

In this book Habakkuk is lifted by an angel to Babylon to provide Daniel with some food while he is in the lion’s den. The Chaldean Empire around 600 BC. 11 places him in the middle to last quarter of the 7th century BC. The reasoning for this date is that it is during his reign that the Neo-Babylonian Empire of the Chaldeans was growing in power.

The Babylonians marched against Jerusalem in 598 BC. Jehoiakim died while the Babylonians were marching towards Jerusalem and Jehoiakim’s eighteen-year-old son Jehoiachin assumed the throne.